Friday, 11 February 2011

MESIR 10 Februari

Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak makes a televised statement to his nation in this image taken from TV Thursday Feb. 10, 2011. Following more than two weeks of protests, anti-government demonstrators were given hope by official statements suggesting that Mubarak may step down after 30 years in power. But Mubarak said in his statement that while protester demands are legitimate, he won't give in to foreign dictates. He also said he has handed some powers to his vice president. (AP Photo/ Egypt TV via APTN) EGYPT OUT TV OUT


An Egyptian protester holds a poster Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011 during a march in Alexandria, Egypt. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt's wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law. The Arabic sign reads " Mubarak, No listen, talk, speak". (AP Photo/ Tarek Fawzy)

Umm Haider holds a picture of her dead son Hameed Haider who was a lawyer and was killed in 2004 during the sectarian violence that swept Iraq, she said. Lawyers called for the end of judicial corruption and prisoner abuse in one of the biggest anti-government demonstrations in Iraq since the start of popular uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia. (AP Photo/Khalid Mohammed)

An Egyptian Anti-government protester marches with a banner reading "the end" as he celebrates in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of 'We're almost there, we're almost there' and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

Egyptian protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television Thursday it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of "We're almost there, we're almost there" and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of "We're almost there, we're almost there" and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

An Egyptian soldier watches as protesters pray in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Thousands of state workers and impoverished Egyptians launched strikes and protests around the country on Thursday over their economic woes as anti-government activists sought to expand their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak despite warnings from the vice president that protests won't be tolerated much longer. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of "We're almost there, we're almost there" and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)


Egyptian protesters pray in front of a tank in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Anti-government protesters stretch in a street as part of their daily exercises after spending the night in front of the Egyptian Parliament in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Around 2,000 protesters waved huge flags outside the parliament, several blocks from Tahrir Square, where they moved two days earlier in the movement's first expansion out of the square. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

The local government headquarters, is set on fire by protesters, claiming delays on requests for housing in Port Said Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt's wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law. (AP Photo)

Egyptian lawyers in black robes shout anti-Mubarak slogans in front of their syndicate in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb.10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt's wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law. Arabic sign reads ' We demand devolving of the parliament". (AP Photo/Mohammed Abou Zaid)

An elderly Egyptian raises a copy of Islam's holy book, the Quran, as he marches with lawyers in black robes in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt's wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law. (AP Photo/ Mohammed Abou Zaid)

A protester holds a placard showing Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and reading "Go out... Just do it" at the continuing anti-government demonstration in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Egyptian protesters, who claim delaying for their requests to get homes, near to a vehicle set alight, belonging to Port Said governorate headquarters, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt's wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law. (AP Photo)

An Egyptian lawyer shouts anti-Mubarak slogans as lawyers streamed into Cairo's Tahrir Square, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Labor unrest across the country gave powerful momentum to Egypt's wave of anti-government protests. With its efforts to manage the crisis failing, the government threatened the army could crack down by imposing martial law. The poster written in Arabic reads " Before you leave we want the 70 billion dollars" . (AP Photo/ Mohammed Abou Zaid)

Anti-government protesters jog along a street as part of their daily exercises after spending the night in front of the Egyptian Parliament in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Around 2,000 protesters waved huge flags outside the parliament, several blocks from Tahrir Square, where they moved two days earlier in the movement's first expansion out of the square. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Egyptian medical workers demonstrate in Cairo, Egypt, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's foreign minister warns of a military coup if protesters continue mass demonstrations and don't follow a government-run framework for enacting gradual reform. The comments by Foreign Minister Ahmed Aboul Gheit were the second veiled threat this week from the regime of a direct military takeover if protests persist. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)


Anti-government protesters demonstrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Thousands of state workers and impoverished Egyptians launched strikes and protests around the country on Thursday over their economic woes as anti-government activists sought to expand their campaign to oust President Hosni Mubarak despite warnings from the vice president that protests won't be tolerated much longer. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)

Anti-government protesters celebrate in Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. Egypt's military announced on national television it had stepped in to secure the country and promised protesters calling for President Hosni Mubarak's ouster that all their demands would soon be met. Tens of thousands of protesters packed in central Tahrir broke into chants of 'We're almost there, we're almost there' and waved V-for-victory signs as thousands more flowed in to join them well after nightfall. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

A horse-drawn carriage rides along Kasr El-Nil bridge as a rainbow is seen over Tahrir Square in downtown Cairo, Egypt Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

1 comment:

ibnuyassir said...

Ar Rayah World News

Mubarak Berundur, Khilafah Akan Kembali

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